What is Browsing?

March 16, 2017

Browsing is the activity of engaging in a series of glimpses, each of which exposes the browser to objects of potential interest; depending on interest, the browser may or may not examine more closely one or more of the (physical or represented) objects; this examination, depending on interest, may or may not lead the browser to (physically or conceptually) acquire the object.

Marcia J. Bates


March 16, 2017

“Make sure every click makes the user more confident”

Jared M Spool in Disambiguity conference


Baseline grids

March 15, 2017
  • Typography is the foundation of great design. Where ever possible I like to make use of the traditional typographic scale (6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, 18, 21, 24, 30, 48, 60, 72, 80, 96) as mentioned in Robert Bringhust’s book The Elements of Typographic Style. It’s a great way to establish a clear hierarchy and vertical rhythm for your project.
  • A 4px baseline grid provides the consistency and flexibility to design for both web and mobile without having to rethink about different measurements.

Rich McNabb


Modular Web design

February 20, 2017

This is exactly what modularity brings to UI design: It leads to a system that is

  • flexible,
  • scalable and
  • cost-efficient, but also
  • customizable,
  • reusable and
  • consistent.

Adriana de La Cuadra: Designing Modular UI Systems via style-guide-driven development

 


Why White Space Is Crucial To UX Design

February 14, 2017

White space can be broken down into four elements:

  • visual white space (space surrounding graphics, icons, and images);
  • layout white space (margins, paddings, and gutters);
  • text white space (spacing between lines and spacing between letters); and
  • content white space (space separating columns of text).

Jerry Cao and Kamil Zieba and Matt Ellis


Design critique

December 19, 2016

Criticism passes judgement — Critique poses questions
Criticism finds fault — Critique uncovers opportunity
Criticism is personal — Critique is objective
Criticism is vague — Critique is concrete
Criticism tears down — Critique builds up
Criticism is ego-centric — Critique is altruistic
Criticism is adversarial — Critique is cooperative
Criticism belittles the designer — Critique improves the design

From: Judy Reeves

See also Jared Spool’s article


Design the beginning

October 31, 2016

The “beginning” is how you introduce something new to a person, and how you will get them to understand its value such that they incorporate it into their lives. When you set about designing the beginning, you are forced to consider the following hard questions:

  1. Where and how will people first hear about your product or feature?
  2. What should people understand about your product at a glance, and is that compelling enough to convince them to go through the trouble of trying it out?
  3. What should people’s first-time experience through your product be, and how do you plan to demonstrate to them its value within the first minute?
  4. How will you build out the social graph, content inventory, marketplace, etc. if the success of your product is dependent on those things?
  5. What would compel somebody to come back and use your product a second or third time?

Julie Zhuo: Design the Beginning


Service vs Experience

October 26, 2016

The difference between a service and an experience is that while both are intangible, that is, you cannot touch that, service is only that – whereas an experience is also designed to be memorable.

From James Wallman – Stuffocation, Living with Less (p.248)


User research methods overview

October 20, 2016

user-research-methods.png

From: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/which-ux-research-methods/


Entrainment

September 29, 2016

[Form and aesthetics, sustainability, spatial energy, and intention] unite to create intelligent spaces that affect visitors on an emotional level, eventually triggering transformation. This is a result of an energetic transmission process that is commonly referred to in science as entrainment, whereby two oscillating systems assume the same frequency or rhythm when they interact. Picture a table full of metronomes. If at the start the metronomes are all ticking at different beats, they will soon synchronise and take the same rhythm. This is what happens in energetically with visitors in sacred spaces.

Marc Peridis