Product funnel

August 8, 2017

The actual funnel depends on the type of product, e.g. for You Tube, NYT, Buzzfeed

  1. Awareness
  2. Education
  3. Engagement
  4. Conversion
  5. Revenue
  6. Recurrence

OR (SaaS, enterprises w Freemium plan etc.)

  1. Awareness
  2. Education
  3. Conversion
  4. Engagement
  5. Recurrence
  6. Revenue

From: Laura Klein et.al. Build better Products

 


Jobs to be done

August 7, 2017

The Jobs-to-Be-Done framework is a representations of user needs born out of qualitative user research, such as field studies, interviews, and discount usability testing. It involves identifying for which goals customers “hire” your product (and, ideally, also finding out if there are competitor products that these users are ready to “fire”). Armed with this understanding, a product team can think about the nature of the users’ core problems and needs from a fresh perspective, and devise product features that solve that main need as best as possible.

For example, if a traditional task analysis unearthed that delivery drivers frequently needed to print out directions that showed how to navigate between each stop on their daily route, it’s likely that the design team would focus on making it as easy as possible for the drivers to format and print the directions; however, a JTBD-focused approach would focus on the delivery driver’s “job” (that is, getting navigation guidance while driving), and would look for solutions to that problem (such as a GPS system providing voice guidance).

Oftentimes, we hear JTBD advocates referring to the famous Theodore Levitt quote, “People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill, they want a quarter-inch hole.” Rather than focusing on a list of features for a product, the JTBD framework forces designers to think about outcomes: would users be able to (happily and easily) complete the job they “hired” the product for? Does this solution provide a better outcome than existing ones?

From: Personas vs. Jobs-to-Be-Done by Page Laubheimer

 

 

 


Persona attributes

August 7, 2017

Most well-crafted personas include a multitude of information such as:Demographic details, such as age, marital status, or income:

Personas vs JTBD by Page Laubheimer


August 7, 2017

Most well-crafted personas include a multitude of information such as:

  • Demographic details, such as age, marital status, or income
  • Personal details, such as a short biography, photograph, and name
  • Attitudinal and/or cognitive details, such as information about the persona’s mental model, pain points, and feelings about the tasks that need to be accomplished
  • Goals and motivations for using the product
  • Behavioral details about how the persona tends to act when using the product

Personas vs JTBD by Page Laubheimer


Replacing The User Story With The Job Story

August 1, 2017

Summed up, the problem with user stories is that it’s too many assumptions and doesn’t acknowledge causality. When a task is put in the format of a user story ( As a [type of user], I want [some action], so that [outcome] ) there’s no room to ask ‘why’ — you’re essentially locked into a particular sequence with no context.

[Suggested job sytory]

We frame every design problem in a Job, focusing on the triggering event or situation, the motivation and goal, and the intended outcome:
When _____ , I want to _____ , so I can _____ .
For example: When an important new customer signs up, I want to be notified, so I can start a conversation with them.

Alan Klement: Replacing the User Story with the Job Story


All models are wrong

August 1, 2017

“All models are wrong, but some are useful”

George E.P. Box

Snice OR OSEMN – taxonomy of data

August 1, 2017

What a scientist does in roughly chronological order: Obtain, Scrub, Explore, Model, and iNterpret

  1. Obtain: pointing and clicking does not scale.
  2. Scrub: the world is a messy place
  3. Explore: You can see a lot by looking
  4. Models: always bad, sometimes ugly
  5. iNterpret: “The purpose of computing is insight, not numbers.”

Hilary Mason: A taxonomy of data

 


Types of animations

July 31, 2017

To create good motion it is necessary to be conscious of the types of affine transformations available in the UI motion:

  • Translation – changing view position in X or Y axis
  • Scaling – changing the scale of objects width, height or both
  • Rotation – rotating object around X, Y or even Z axis

There is also a possibility to change opacity (alpha property) and color of an object.

The combination of these types may give outstanding results. Your specification has to include a description of the transformation type.

http://uxmisfit.com/2017/04/23/motion-design-specs-how-to-present-animations-and-interactions-to-developers/?ref=hackingui


Cognitive load is lessened with rounded shapes

June 20, 2017

According to research, it’s harder for the brain to process sharp edges — the cognitive load is lessened with rounded shapes.

Molly Mc Hugh

Research:

https://www.fastcodesign.com/3020075/why-our-brains-love-curvy-architecture

https://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2012/11/stop-being-so-square/

http://www.cns.nyu.edu/~david/courses/perception/lecturenotes/depth/depth-size.html


Interface as text

June 6, 2017

“How would I explain to a friend, in a conversation or in an email, this thing/topic/product/story I am trying to communicate?”

Fabricio Teixeira: Storyframes before wireframes: starting designs in the text editor