Workflow remote user testing

For testing with our own users, I created a workflow combining Chatra, Calendly, Skype and Amazon Business (to send out vouchers to our users after the tests).

Pascal Briod

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Interactions for Understanding

  • Animating
  • Annotating
  • Chunking
  • Cloning
  • Collecting
  • Composing
  • Cutting
  • Filtering
  • Fragmenting
  • Probing
  • Rearranging
  • Repicturing
  • Searching

From a workshop and upcoming book, Design for Understanding, by Karl Fast and Stephen P. Anderson

(Copied from C Wodtke’s article)

 

OKRs

The acronym OKR stands for Objective and Key Results. The Objec‐ tive is qualitative, and the Key Results (most often three) are quanti‐ tative. They are used to focus a group or individual on a bold goal. The Objective establishes a goal for a set period of time, usually a quarter. The Key Results indicate whether the Objective has been met by the end of the time.

Your Objective is a single sentence that is:

  • Qualitative and inspirational: The Objective is designed to get people jumping out of bed in the morning with excitement. And while CEOs and VCs might jump out of bed in the morning with joy over a three percent‐ gain in conversion, most mere mortals get excited by a sense of meaning and progress. Use the language of your team. If they want to use slang and say “pwn it” or “kill it,” use that wording.
  • Time-bound: For example, something that is achievable in a month or a quar‐ ter. You want it to be a clear sprint toward a goal. If it takes a year, your Objective might be a strategy or maybe even a mission.
  • Actionable by the team independently: This is less a problem for startups, but bigger companies often struggle because of interdependence. Your Objective has to be truly yours, and you can’t have the excuse of “Marketing didn’t market it.”

BUT …

  • Don’t create objectives that rely on the input of other teams unless you’ve agreed with them that you share priorities.
  • Don’t create objectives that will require people we haven’t hired yet!
  • Be realistic about how much time you will have to achieve your goals.

Key Results take all that inspirational language and quantify it. You create them by asking a couple of simple questions:

How would we know if we met our Objective? What numbers would change?

This forces you to define what you mean by “awesome,” “kill it,” or “pwn.” Does “killing it” mean visitor growth? Revenue? Satisfaction? Or is it a combination of these things?

A company should have about three Key Results for an objective. Key Results can be based on anything you can measure.

 

Christine Wodtke: Introduction to OKRs

The 9x problem

A startup must be in the business of disruptive innovation. Making a company that is only slightly better than the incumbent is a path to failure. In Eager Seller, Stony Buyers John Guernville describes the 9x problem.

In order to get users to change to a new solution, it must be 9 times better than how they solve the problem already. That means sustaining innovation — making a product better — is not sufficient to build a new business. It must be so radically different that users are willing to take on the pain and annoyance of changing products to get the new benefits

C Wodtke: Needfinding for disruptive innovation

Before attaching the term “AI” to your product …

Before attaching the term “AI” to your product or feature idea, ask yourself:

  • How is this different than just a simple algorithm?
  • What exactly is this intelligence going to learn to do by itself?
  • What is the user need for this “AI” feature? Can it be solved in other ways?
  • What are three ways in which this intelligence will benefit users?
  • Do you really need to tell users the product is “powered by AI”?
  • If that’s the case, how can you communicate what “AI” is, with clarity, simplicity and trust?
  • How much visibility, transparency and control will you give users about how the AI operates?

What if this time around we leapfrogged to thinking about “why” we are creating these AI-powered services and what it really means for our users?

UX Trends 2018

Finding the right colour combination

Darker Value = Increment in Saturation is a decrement in Brightness

Lighter Value = Decrement in Saturation is an increment in Brightness

This formula helped me every time I’m in wonder of what right colors should I use on my designs. I learned that the best starting point is to have a base color, and from there, start the adjustments in Saturation and Brightness while keeping the Hue value the same.

Riel M 10 cheat codes for designing user interfaces