Facebook’s command over everyone’s attention span

May 16, 2016

Facebook’s command over everyone’s attention span, as well as its deft use of your personal data, has turned it into a money-spinning machine. We may well look back and see Facebook as the most consequential development in publishing since the invention of hot type. But Facebook holds most of the cards, and even the smallest changes in how it pushes information out to its billion plus users’ news feeds can make or break a digital publisher.

Lydia Polgreen

 


Page load and attention span

May 9, 2016

With each second that passes while a page loads, fewer users stick around. In fact, 47% of users expect a Web page to load within two seconds. If a page hasn’t loaded within three seconds, 57% of users will leave the site. This is a consequence of human psychology: We have an eight-second attention span. (That’s shorter than the attention span of a goldfish.)

Jacqueline Kyo Thomas

 


Parallax scrolling

May 9, 2016

“In the age-old debate between beauty and function, parallax scrolling wins the beauty pageant, but fails miserably in terms of function.”

Parallax Scrolling: Attention Getter or Headache? by Jacqueline Kyo Thomas


How Friendly is your site?

March 28, 2016

Check how friendly your site is:

Mobile friendly? There is a good chance that some of your users will be arriving via their phones and tablets, and almost nothing is more di cult to navigate than a site thats not mobile friendly. If a user cannot navigate your site, they can’t become customers.

Browser friendly? Not all browsers are built the same–that goes without saying, but do you know what browsers are most popular among your users? There is a chance that your site is awesome on Chrome, but a mess on Internet Explorer. Do the research. Load up the browsers and make sure a user’s arrival is always solid. Fixing any browser speci c issues could result in rise in conversions.

Privacy friendly? It is good to show users their information is secure: signals, like SSL (https://) lock images, trusted badges, and social proof can all allay fears. Make sure you have a complete privacy policy linked from the footer of every page on your site.

Language friendly? There are 50 million Spanish-language Internet users in the United States alone. That’s more than the total Internet-using population of the UK. If you’re ignoring language support, you could be leaving a lot of money on the table.

User friendly? No user will ever complain that your site is too easy to use, fast or clear. A mistake free site is a credible site.

Click friendly? How many clicks does it take for a user to get to your must have experience? Have you ever counted? Think less. Think the clearest and easiest path to revenue.

Time friendly? Information on your landing page should be prioritized by importance. You typically have ve seconds to convince a visitor to stick around. Make the most of that brief moment in time. How good is your hook, and how well do you deliver on the promise?

Video friendly? A video on your landing page has the chance to drive conversions. Consider YouTube, or other services as long as users do not have to download additional plugins. Videos can elicit an emotional response that connects with users and drives conversion.

Rating & review friendly? If your site has a rating system for product feedback, it is best not to be totalitarian. Erasing all negative feedback will only have uses questioning your credibility. If you allow reviews on your site, make sure the quality is high. Zappos found that correcting spelling errors in product reviews increased conversion. Details matter![5, 6]


serendipity in ecommerce

March 1, 2016

One of the biggest issues for online retailers is their inability to generate any real notion of serendipity.

How Tinder has changed ecommerce By Youtse Sung


Lightbox overlay

February 4, 2016

Don’t use an overlay unless you have a clear, compelling case for why this content should not be presented within a regular page. Good reasons for using an overlay could include:

  • The user is about to take an action that has serious consequences and is difficult to reverse.
  • It’s essential to collect a small amount of information before letting users proceed to the next step in a process.
  • The content in the overlay is urgent, and users are more likely to notice it in an overlay.

Kathryn Whitenton in https://www.nngroup.com/articles/overuse-of-overlays/


Three (only?) justifications for mobile apps

December 21, 2015

There’s a reason why they (Apps) are popular on mobile:

  • they are highly contextual and
  • take big advantage of the phones main functionalities, be it geolocation, camera or just voice and sound.
  • They are also aimed at repeated use in small chunks of time.

Jean-Baptiste Coger: Why you shouldn’t bother creating a mobile app.


Micro Moments

December 13, 2015

Early in 2015, Google released a set of articles on what they call “micro-moments”. (…)

I-want-to-know moments

You’re at home with a nice free evening. What shall you do now? Ah! You feel like watching something. So, you want to get to the position where you can choose which movie to watch. You want to know the answer more than anything! So, you’ve just gone online to see. Here, you’re thinking with “the Google initiative”—that is, you’re searching or browsing to find out what’s hot, perhaps seeing what’s not-so-hot as you go down the reviews. You want to know which movie would be the best fit tonight.

I-want-to-go moments

You’ve decided on seeing the latest action blockbuster movie, but where? This is when you want to see what’s “Near me”.

I-want-to-do moments

You may want to learn about a process, service, or product. If you’ve ever gone on YouTube to see what others say about products, or just wanted to see how to do a job (e.g., DIY); that is where to learn. If your motorcycle won’t start and you “sort of” know what’s wrong, YouTube can show what you need. We’ll worry about which company’s motorcycle part in the next micro-moment!

I-want-to-buy moments

Your “final micro-moment” might have you start by watching any of over 1 million YouTube videos as you zero-in on which motorcycle part is the most reliable/best value before making the buy. If we’ve gone to the movie theater, maybe a friend shows us the trailer of another movie. Finding it better, you’re “sold” on seeing that instead. Congratulations, you’ve completed the process.

 

From: Muriel Garreta Domingo: Micro-moments: Are you designing for them?


Ellis: Information Gathering Behaviour

December 13, 2015

Ellis (1987, 1989) carried out a study in which he used semi-structured interviews for data collection and Glaser and Strauss’s grounded theory for data analysis. His research resulted in a pattern of information-seeking behavior among social scientists that included six generic features:

  • Starting: comprising those activities characteristic of the initial search for information such as identifying references that could serve as starting points of the research cycle. These references often include sources that have been used before as well as sources that are expected to provide relevant information. Asking colleagues or consulting literature reviews, online catalogs, and indexes and abstracts often initiate starting activities.
  • Chaining: following chains of citations or other forms of referential connection between materials or sources identified during “starting” activities. Chaining can be backward or forward. Backward chaining takes place when references from an initial source are followed. In the reverse direction, forward chaining identifies, and follows up on, other sources that refer to an original source.
  • Browsing: casually looking for information in areas of potential interest. It not only includes scanning of published journals and tables of contents but also of references and abstracts of printouts from retrospective literature searches.
  • Differentiating: using known differences (e.g., author and journal hierarchies or nature and quality of information) between sources as a way of filtering the amount of information obtained.
  • Monitoring: keeping abreast of developments in an area by regularly following particular sources (e.g., core journals, newspapers, conferences, magazines, books, and catalogs).
  • Extracting: activities associated with going through a particular source or sources and selectively identifying relevant material from those sources (e.g., sets of journals, series of monographs, collections of indexes, abstracts or bibliographies, and computer databases).

Lokman I. Meho & Helen R. Tibbo: Modeling the Information-Seeking Behavior of Social Scientists: Ellis’s Study Revisited (PDF)

 

In other words … (Ellis 1993?):

  1. Starting: identifying sources of interest.
  2. Chaining: following leads from an initial source.
  3. Browsing: scanning documents or sources for interesting information.
  4. Differentiating: assessing and organising sources.
  5. Monitoring: keeping up-to-date on an area of interest by tracking new developments in known sources such as journals.
  6. Extracting: identifying (and using) material of interest in sources.
  7. Verifying: checking the accuracy and reliability of information.
  8. Ending: concluding activities.

The Anatomy of an Addictive App

December 9, 2015

1. Trigger: Whether internal or external, the trigger is the tactic you employ to bring users to your app. External triggers, such as push notifications, come from within the app and prompt user action, while internal triggers are abstract and psychological, creating emotional responses like a fear of missing out or the desire to avoid frustrating experiences like going into a physical store.

2. Action: The action is what you want your customers to do after they respond to a trigger. To prompt the right action, designers need to consider the frame of mind users are in after reacting to the trigger: What’s motivating them, and which specific trigger caused their entry?

3. Reward: The reward is what users receive after taking action. Perhaps it’s an entertaining story to share with someone, a cure for their boredom, a discount they’ve unlocked, or a purchased product.

4. Investment: When your app promotes frequent, focused attention, you create a high level of user investment. The time someone spends building a profile—while perhaps earning loyalty points as a reward—creates a subconscious desire to justify the time spent through continual use.

Originally from Nir Eyal, referenced by Bobby Emamian


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