There are important things we can’t easily or accurately measure.

July 6, 2016

If we could read user’s minds, then we could in theory design the perfect experience for them. Unfortunately, we’re not all Jean Greys, so we make due with what we can measure to try and take educated guesses as to what people care about. In this day and age, what we can measure has its limits, and it’s important to always remember that. Simply looking at what people are doing in your product can’t tell you:

  • the degree to which people love, hate, or are indifferent to your product or any of its specific features
  • whether a change increases or decreases people’s trust in your product over time
  • how simple and easy to use your product is perceived to be
  • how people see your product versus other similar products in the market
  • what things people most want changed, added, or fixed
  • how people will want to use your product as time passes

Julie Zhuo: Metrics Versus Experience


A Circumplex Model of Affect

July 4, 2016

By James A. Russell (PDF)

Evidence suggests that relationship between affective states can be represented by a spatial model in which affective concepts fall in a circle in the following order: pleasure (0°), excitement (45°), arousal (90°), distress (135°), displeasure (180°), depression (225°), sleepiness (270°), relaxation (315°)


User experience is not a set of features

June 16, 2016

“The core user experience is not a set of features; in fact, it is the job users hire the product for. Uber’s core user experience is to get a taxi easily at any time. The countdown, displaying when exactly the taxi will arrive, is a suitable feature that expands this experience.”

Brilliant article.

Nikkel Blaase: Why Product Thinking is the next big thing in UX Design

 


Jobs-to-be-done (JTBD) Technique

June 9, 2016

A JTBD is not a product, service, or a specific solution; it’s the higher purpose for which customers buy products, services, and solutions. (…) It helps the innovator understand that customers don’t buy products and services; they hire various solutions at various times to get a wide array of jobs done.

There are two different types of JTBDs:

  1. Main jobs to be done, which describe the task that customers want to achieve.
  2. Related jobs to be done, which customers want to accomplish in conjunction with the main jobs to be done.

Then, within each of these two types of JTBDs, there are:

  1. Functional job aspects—the practical and objective customer requirements.
  2. Emotional job aspects—the subjective customer requirements related to feelings and perception.

Finally, emotional job aspects are further broken down into:

  1. Personal dimension—how the customer feels about the solution
  2. Social dimension—how the customer believes he or she is perceived by others while using the solution.

(…) The better a solution can fulfill all of these job levels and layers, the better chance it has in the marketplace. Also, the better the solution either achieves or nicely dovetails with related JTBDs, the better chance of success it has. In short, the JTBD concept is a guide for thinking beyond to make your current solutions, and your competitors’ solutions, obsolete.

From The Innovator’s Toolkit

 

The Progress Making Forces Diagram

This diagram can be used (e.g. in interviews) to explore physical, functional, social, and emotional aspects of the forces that pull people towards either tried and tested and innovative solutions.

Screen-Shot-2012-10-29-at-7.16.58-PM

 

From jobstobedone.org

 

The Customer-Jobs-To-Be-Done Canvas by Helge Tennø

Screen Shot 2016-06-09 at 17.14.26


Facebook’s command over everyone’s attention span

May 16, 2016

Facebook’s command over everyone’s attention span, as well as its deft use of your personal data, has turned it into a money-spinning machine. We may well look back and see Facebook as the most consequential development in publishing since the invention of hot type. But Facebook holds most of the cards, and even the smallest changes in how it pushes information out to its billion plus users’ news feeds can make or break a digital publisher.

Lydia Polgreen

 


Page load and attention span

May 9, 2016

With each second that passes while a page loads, fewer users stick around. In fact, 47% of users expect a Web page to load within two seconds. If a page hasn’t loaded within three seconds, 57% of users will leave the site. This is a consequence of human psychology: We have an eight-second attention span. (That’s shorter than the attention span of a goldfish.)

Jacqueline Kyo Thomas

 


Parallax scrolling

May 9, 2016

“In the age-old debate between beauty and function, parallax scrolling wins the beauty pageant, but fails miserably in terms of function.”

Parallax Scrolling: Attention Getter or Headache? by Jacqueline Kyo Thomas


How Friendly is your site?

March 28, 2016

Check how friendly your site is:

Mobile friendly? There is a good chance that some of your users will be arriving via their phones and tablets, and almost nothing is more di cult to navigate than a site thats not mobile friendly. If a user cannot navigate your site, they can’t become customers.

Browser friendly? Not all browsers are built the same–that goes without saying, but do you know what browsers are most popular among your users? There is a chance that your site is awesome on Chrome, but a mess on Internet Explorer. Do the research. Load up the browsers and make sure a user’s arrival is always solid. Fixing any browser speci c issues could result in rise in conversions.

Privacy friendly? It is good to show users their information is secure: signals, like SSL (https://) lock images, trusted badges, and social proof can all allay fears. Make sure you have a complete privacy policy linked from the footer of every page on your site.

Language friendly? There are 50 million Spanish-language Internet users in the United States alone. That’s more than the total Internet-using population of the UK. If you’re ignoring language support, you could be leaving a lot of money on the table.

User friendly? No user will ever complain that your site is too easy to use, fast or clear. A mistake free site is a credible site.

Click friendly? How many clicks does it take for a user to get to your must have experience? Have you ever counted? Think less. Think the clearest and easiest path to revenue.

Time friendly? Information on your landing page should be prioritized by importance. You typically have ve seconds to convince a visitor to stick around. Make the most of that brief moment in time. How good is your hook, and how well do you deliver on the promise?

Video friendly? A video on your landing page has the chance to drive conversions. Consider YouTube, or other services as long as users do not have to download additional plugins. Videos can elicit an emotional response that connects with users and drives conversion.

Rating & review friendly? If your site has a rating system for product feedback, it is best not to be totalitarian. Erasing all negative feedback will only have uses questioning your credibility. If you allow reviews on your site, make sure the quality is high. Zappos found that correcting spelling errors in product reviews increased conversion. Details matter![5, 6]


serendipity in ecommerce

March 1, 2016

One of the biggest issues for online retailers is their inability to generate any real notion of serendipity.

How Tinder has changed ecommerce By Youtse Sung


Lightbox overlay

February 4, 2016

Don’t use an overlay unless you have a clear, compelling case for why this content should not be presented within a regular page. Good reasons for using an overlay could include:

  • The user is about to take an action that has serious consequences and is difficult to reverse.
  • It’s essential to collect a small amount of information before letting users proceed to the next step in a process.
  • The content in the overlay is urgent, and users are more likely to notice it in an overlay.

Kathryn Whitenton in https://www.nngroup.com/articles/overuse-of-overlays/


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