Usability bugs are bugs

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There is an opportunity cost in spending time with dysfunctional, anti-usability managers who don’t respect usability or, for that matter, the user. By focusing on projects where you can make one good product you are not cranking out a bunch of mediocre products. One highly visible “win” is worth a thousand tiny wins.

No company will tolerate a usability department refusing to work for business units that aren’t worthy of usability services. Fulton’s advised disseminating best practices and other front-line documents that tackle the most common usability mistakes. Secondly, after doing testing for a group, don’t test for them again until they have incorporated your feedback. Usability bugs are bugs; if programmers are not going to treat them as such, stop spending time finding and reporting them.
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Zachary Lym: WHY AN APPLE FANBOY WOULD WANT TO WORK FOR MICROSOFT: IMPROVING THE PERCEIVED IMPORTANCE OF USABILITY WITHIN ORGANIZATIONS