User interface best practices

  • Be welcoming
  • Know thy user
  • Let the content shine
  • Make selections fast and error-free
  • Provide appropriate feedback
  • Minimize the pain

Ginsburg 2011: p. 192

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Use scenarios

Scenarios can help uncover gaps in solutions and potential usability issues.

Motivation

  • What prompted the persona to embark on the scenario

Context

  • Where is the persona while the scenario takes place?
  • Does the context change over the course of the scenario?
  • Who else is involved?
  • What other devices are involved?

Distractions

  • What kinds of distractions or interruptions typically occur in the scenario?
  • How does the persona deal with such distractions?

Goal

  • What is the persona’s goal in the scenario?
  • Is it information, an artifact, an emotion?

Ginsburg 2011: P.82

Gestures in iOS

  • Tap – To select a control or item (analogous to single mouse click)
  • Drag – To scroll or pan (controlled; any direction; slow speed)
  • Flick – To scroll or pan quickly (less controlled; directional; faster speed
  • Swipe – Used in a table-view row to reveal the Delete button
  • Double Tap – To zoom in and center a block of content or an image; To zoom out (if already zoomed in)
  • Pinch Open – To zoom in
  • Pinch Close – To zoom out
  • Touch and Hold – In editable text, to display a magnified view for cursor positioning; also used to cut/copy/paste, and select text.

Ginsburg 2011, p.22

Empathy Map

What does she think and feel?

  • What really counts
  • major preoccupations
  • worries & aspirations

What does she see?

  • environment
  • friends
  • what the market offers

What does she say and do?

  • attitude in public
  • appearance
  • behaviour toward others

What does she hear?

  • what friends say
  • what boss says
  • what influencers say

Summary:

Pain

  • fears
  • frustrations
  • obstacles

Gain

  • wants/needs
  • measures of success

Based on a tool developed by XPLANE; described in: Osterwalder, A. & Pigneur, Y.: Business Model Generation; Hoboken, NJ:2010. pages 130

Customer-centric business model design

  • What job)s) do(es) our customer need to get done and how can we help? What are our customer’s aspiratins and how can ewe help him live up to them?
  • How do our customers prefer to be addressed? How do we, as an enterprise best fit into their routines?
  • What relationship do our customers expect us to establish with them?
  • For what value(s) are customers truly willing to pay?

Osterwalder, A. & Pigneur, Y.: Business Model Generation; Hoboken, NJ:2010. pages 129

Business Model Strawman

The 9 building blocks of a business model

  • Customer segments – An organisation serves one or several customer segments
  • Value Propositions – It seeks to solve customer problems and satisfy customer needs with value propositions
  • Channels – Value propostions are delivered to customers through communication, distribution, and sales Channels
  • Customer Relationships – Customer erlationshipsare established and maintained with each Customer Sefgment
  • Revenue Streams – Revenue Streams result from value propositions successfully offered to customers.
  • Key resources – Key resources are the assets required to offer and deliver the previously described elements …
  • Key Activities – … by performing a number of key activities
  • Key Partnerships – Some activities are outsourced and some resources are acquired outside the enterprise
  • Cost Structure – The business modelel ements result in the cost structure

Osterwalder, A. & Pigneur, Y.: Business Model Generation; Hoboken, NJ:2010. pages 16/17

For printable canvas to be used in WS etc. see www.businessmodelgeneration.com