Archive for November, 2015

Latent requirements

November 24, 2015

When we design innovative solutions we often have to deal with two types of end-user requirements:

Obvious (explicit) requirements: clearly articulated improvements, amendments or extensions. For example, a faster horse, a cheaper car, more memory, more screens, louder speakers, and so on.

Latent requirements: unmet needs that people find difficult to express, write down or articulate.

Most people, when invited to contribute to the “innovation” of a product or service, end up simply describing an evolution of something familiar – their contribution to the process is limited by what they know. A conversation about the “possible” is difficult enough; and a structured conversation about the “impossible” is, well, nearly impossible. Researchers, designers and other “proxies” intervene to develop an understanding of what people really need. It is this understanding that drives innovation; not the users themselves.

http://blog.tobiasandtobias.com/2014/04/is-it-time-to-put-henrys-horses-out-to-grass/

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‘How Might We’ (brainstorming) questions

November 19, 2015

Example: Redesign airport design from the POV of stressed mother.

  • Amp up the good: HMW use the kids’ energy to entertain fellow passenger?
  • Remove the bad: HMW separate the kids from fellow passengers?
  • Explore the opposite: HMW make the wait the most exciting part of the trip?
  • Question an assumption: HMW entirely remove the wait time at the airport?
  • Go after adjectives: HMW we make the rush refreshing instead of harrying?
  • ID unexpected resources: HMW leverage free time of fellow passengers to share the load?
  • Create an analogy from need or context: HMW make the airport like a spa? Like a playground?
  • Play POV against the challenge: HMW make the airport a place that kids want to go?
  • Change a status quo: HMW make playful, loud kids less annoying?
  • Break POV into pieces: HMW entertain kids? HMW slow a mom down? HMW mollify delayed passengers?

http://dschool.stanford.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/HMW-METHODCARD.pdf