Archive for the 'signposts' Category

Service design blueprint

April 9, 2017
A blueprint is an operational tool that visualizes the components of a
service in enough detail to analyze, implement, and maintain it.
Blueprints show the orchestration of people, touchpoints, processes,
and technology both frontstage (what customers see) and backstage
(what is behind the scenes). They can be used to describe the existing
state of a service experience as well as to support defining and implementing new or improved services. While service blueprints resemble approaches to process documentation, they keep the focus on the customer experience while showing how operations deliver that experience.
Nick Remis / Adaptive Path

What is Browsing?

March 16, 2017

Browsing is the activity of engaging in a series of glimpses, each of which exposes the browser to objects of potential interest; depending on interest, the browser may or may not examine more closely one or more of the (physical or represented) objects; this examination, depending on interest, may or may not lead the browser to (physically or conceptually) acquire the object.

Marcia J. Bates

Entrainment

September 29, 2016

[Form and aesthetics, sustainability, spatial energy, and intention] unite to create intelligent spaces that affect visitors on an emotional level, eventually triggering transformation. This is a result of an energetic transmission process that is commonly referred to in science as entrainment, whereby two oscillating systems assume the same frequency or rhythm when they interact. Picture a table full of metronomes. If at the start the metronomes are all ticking at different beats, they will soon synchronise and take the same rhythm. This is what happens in energetically with visitors in sacred spaces.

Marc Peridis

Jobs-to-be-done (JTBD) Technique

June 9, 2016

A JTBD is not a product, service, or a specific solution; it’s the higher purpose for which customers buy products, services, and solutions. (…) It helps the innovator understand that customers don’t buy products and services; they hire various solutions at various times to get a wide array of jobs done.

There are two different types of JTBDs:

  1. Main jobs to be done, which describe the task that customers want to achieve.
  2. Related jobs to be done, which customers want to accomplish in conjunction with the main jobs to be done.

Then, within each of these two types of JTBDs, there are:

  1. Functional job aspects—the practical and objective customer requirements.
  2. Emotional job aspects—the subjective customer requirements related to feelings and perception.

Finally, emotional job aspects are further broken down into:

  1. Personal dimension—how the customer feels about the solution
  2. Social dimension—how the customer believes he or she is perceived by others while using the solution.

(…) The better a solution can fulfill all of these job levels and layers, the better chance it has in the marketplace. Also, the better the solution either achieves or nicely dovetails with related JTBDs, the better chance of success it has. In short, the JTBD concept is a guide for thinking beyond to make your current solutions, and your competitors’ solutions, obsolete.

From The Innovator’s Toolkit

 

The Progress Making Forces Diagram

This diagram can be used (e.g. in interviews) to explore physical, functional, social, and emotional aspects of the forces that pull people towards either tried and tested and innovative solutions.

Screen-Shot-2012-10-29-at-7.16.58-PM

 

From jobstobedone.org

 

The Customer-Jobs-To-Be-Done Canvas by Helge Tennø

Screen Shot 2016-06-09 at 17.14.26

MVE Minimum Viable Experience

December 8, 2015

Minimum Viable Experience: The smallest, easiest-to-make version of your idea that you can reasonably launch as an experience.

Ben Crothers

Latent requirements

November 24, 2015

When we design innovative solutions we often have to deal with two types of end-user requirements:

Obvious (explicit) requirements: clearly articulated improvements, amendments or extensions. For example, a faster horse, a cheaper car, more memory, more screens, louder speakers, and so on.

Latent requirements: unmet needs that people find difficult to express, write down or articulate.

Most people, when invited to contribute to the “innovation” of a product or service, end up simply describing an evolution of something familiar – their contribution to the process is limited by what they know. A conversation about the “possible” is difficult enough; and a structured conversation about the “impossible” is, well, nearly impossible. Researchers, designers and other “proxies” intervene to develop an understanding of what people really need. It is this understanding that drives innovation; not the users themselves.

http://blog.tobiasandtobias.com/2014/04/is-it-time-to-put-henrys-horses-out-to-grass/

Design Thinking

September 8, 2015

Design Thinking is a people centered way of solving difficult problems. It follows a collaborative, team based, cross-disciplinary process. It uses a toolkit of methods and can be applied by anyone from the most seasoned corporate designers and executives to school children.

Design Thinking is an approach that seeks practical and innovative solutions to problems. It can be used to develop products, services, experiences, and strategy. It is an approach that allows designers to go beyond focusing on improving the appearance of things to provide a framework for solving complex problems. Design Thinking combines empathy for people and their context with tools to discover insight. It drives business value. (…) Design Thinkers observe users and their physical environments, interact with them with prototypes, and feed the outcomes of their experiences back into the design.

(…)

Design Thinking can be applied throughout the design process:

  1. Define intent
  2. Know context
  3. Know users
  4. Frame insights
  5. Explore concepts
  6. Make plans
  7. Deliver offering

From: Service Design: 250 essential methods by Robert A Curedale

Value proposition

September 8, 2015

A value proposition is a promise of value to be delivered. It’s the primary reason a prospect should buy from you.

In a nutshell, value proposition is a clear statement that

  • explains how your product solves customers’ problems or improves their situation (relevancy),
  • delivers specific benefits (quantified value),
  • tells the ideal customer why they should buy from you and not from the competition (unique differentiation).

http://conversionxl.com/value-proposition-examples-how-to-create/

Balanced Scorecard

September 7, 2015

Going back to Kaplan and Norton ,,,

Successful business strategy needs to address objective in these interrelated key areas:

  • Financial
  • Customer relation
  • Process/technology
  • People (Employees)

barnes/kelleher 2015 pp. 239-240

Touchpoints

September 7, 2015

Touchpoint are those processes and activities that are both visible to the company and the customer. Examples include the following:

  • Advertisements
  • websites
  • emails
  • direct mail
  • phone calls
  • text messages
  • point of purchase displays
  • SIgnage
  • physical storefront
  • vehicles
  • contracts

there is a lot going on at these touch points, eg:

  • task, transaction, or process is executed
  • customer need, want, or desire isuncovered
  • customer expectations are set
  • Promises are made, met, broken
  • customer emotions (good, bad, ugly) are created, cemented, ignored
  • employees behave or misbehave
  • customer data is used or abused
  • additional customer information is gathered, stored, passed on (or not) to the next point of customer interaction
  • marketing collateral is distributed and used (or not)
  • performance measures are recorded and captured
  • standard operation procedures are ignored, executed brilliantly, or perhaps rammed down customers throats
  • the cash register rings

barnes/kelleher 2015: 98-9