Posts Tagged ‘BolterGromala’

Experience Design

June 11, 2008
  1. Experience design is remediating design: (…) it understands its relationship to earlier media forms
  2. Experience design is diverse (…) it welcomes the multiplicity of digital media forms
  3. Experience design is embodied design (…) it recognizes how digital technologies seek to embody he virtual
  4. Experience design is contextual design (…) it understands the importance of the cultural and economic contexts in which it will function

From: Bolter, Jay David and Gromala, Diane (2003), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art, and the Myth of Transparency, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, p. 148

Plato: ideas

June 11, 2008

“Almost 2,400 years ago, Plato made the case against cultural context. The best of all possible worlds, he thought, was one removed from the tainting influence of embodiment I even from the taint of human culture. Plato despised politics, just as, like a good Greek aristocrat, he despised the world of commerce. In fact, Plato believed that our embodied, everyday world was only a poor reflection of the real world, which for him was an invisible world of abstract ideas, or forms. This is the great Platonic reversal. It would seem obvious that the world of ideas depends on the world of the senses and culture, because people can’t come up with ideas unless they are alive in this world and find themselves in a particular cultural milieu. But Plato reversed the dependency. He argued that the embodied world of human culture is a reflection of an invisible world of abstract ideas. Moreover, the amazing reversal became a major influence on ancient culture and later Western culture. The French philosopher Descartes in the seventeenth century reiterated this reversal and made sure that it would remain part of Western thinking into the twentieth century.”

From: Bolter, Jay David and Gromala, Diane (2003), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art, and the Myth of Transparency, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, p. 136

HCI critique

June 11, 2008

The study of HCI began at that time, as computer specialists began to worry about how users as embodied creatures could interact with computer programs. The early HCI workers focused on the empirically measurable aspects of user interaction. They were interested in the human body for the limits of response by its senses, nerves, and muscles: how fast the user could press a key in response to a stimulus, what size icons the user could discern and click on, what color combinations the user could discriminate. Their approach was an outgrowth of the long tradition of ergonomics, the study of how workers use machines, or indeed how workers themselves could become machines. Like earlier ergonomics, HCI analysis looked for principles that could be applied to all humans considered as productivity units, not as human beings living under specific conditions and with specific concerns.”

From: Bolter, Jay David and Gromala, Diane (2003), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art, and the Myth of Transparency, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, p. 126-7

transparent and reflective artifacts

June 11, 2008

“Every digital artifact oscillates between being transparent and reflective.”

From: Bolter, Jay David and Gromala, Diane (2003), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art, and the Myth of Transparency, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, p.6

We don’t want our computers to disappear

June 11, 2008

“As producers and as users of digital technology, we don’t want our computers to disappear, any more than we want books, films, or paintings to disappear. As producers and as users, we often want to be aware of the medium in order to understand the experience that it is staging for us.”

From: Bolter, Jay David and Gromala, Diane (2003), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art, and the Myth of Transparency, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, p.5

Web: Structuralists v Designers

June 11, 2008

“This was the great, almost religious difference between the Structuralists and the designers. The Structuralists were separatists, believing that form and content could and should be separated. For them, a Web site is a pipe through which content flows to the user. They opposed elaborate visual design, which they thought impeded the flow of information. The Designers, on the other hand, were unitarians, who believed that form and content could not be separated: that a Web page communicates its message through the careful interplay of words and images. For the Designers, a Web page is an experience, and they wanted complete control over it, just as they had enjoyed (more or less) complete control in print. So the Designers kept pressing for more html tags that would give them that control.”

From: Bolter, Jay David and Gromala, Diane (2003), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art, and the Myth of Transparency, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, p.4

From: Bolter, Jay David and Gromala, Diane (2003), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art, and the Myth of Transparency, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press