Orphaned pages

“[Orphaned pages are] pages that can only be accessed by direct links from another page but that do not have a home in the site hierarchy.” (eg. disclaimer)

From: Reiss, E.L. (2000), Practical Information Architecture, Harlow: Pearson Education, p. 127

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Pogo sticking

“Whatever you do, don’t cut something up into tiny pieces or force visitors to perform a lot of back and forth navigation. Navigation designers call this phenomenon ‘pogo-sticking’.”

From: Reiss, E.L. (2000), Practical Information Architecture, Harlow: Pearson Education, p. 117

Scent

“In information architecture terms, ‘scent’ refers to the hints a visitor gets from the words and types of words used to label particular subjects.”

From: Reiss, E.L. (2000), Practical Information Architecture, Harlow: Pearson Education, p. 107

Serendipity

“… many professional information architects use the word ‘serendipity’. In other words, visitors may be more likely to accidentally come across something that interests them that they would have missed if they had simply drilled down through a topical hierarchy.”

From: Reiss, E.L. (2000), Practical Information Architecture, Harlow: Pearson Education, p.74

To surface information

“surface – often used as a verb as in “to surface information”, which means to bring information to a higher level within the overall hierarchy or to create contextual links that make it easier for visitors to find related information located elsewhere on the site.”

From: Reiss, E.L. (2000), Practical Information Architecture, Harlow: Pearson Education, p. 13

Information Architecture

“Information architecture deals with the arrangement of browser-based information (more specifically, the internal relationships between individual web pages) so that visitors can do whatever they came to do with as little effort (and confusion) as possible.”

From: Reiss, E.L. (2000), Practical Information Architecture, Harlow: Pearson Education, p. 2

Faceted classification

“This is a faceted classification: a set of mutually exclusive and jointly exhaustive categories, each made by isolating one perspective on the items (a facet), that combine to completely describe all the objects in question, and which users can use, by searching and browsing, to find what they need.”

From: Denton, William (2003), ‘How to make a faceted classification and put it on the Web’, [online] Available: http://www.miskatonic.org/library/facet-web-howto.html