Posts Tagged ‘homepage’

Homepage customisation

September 10, 2014

(…) This is consistent with other research that found that users typically don’t use customization tools; they leave the default setting as is. Users don’t like to spend their time figuring out how part of a website works or what the benefit to them is. They very rarely interact with fancy widgets or elaborate tools, because they want to get their information or complete their task as quickly and possible, and be done.

KATIE SHERWIN: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/breaking-web-conventions/

Design tips to encourage scrolling

April 30, 2010
  1. Less is more – don’t be tempted to cram everything above the fold. Good use of whitespace and imagery encourages exploration.
  2. Stark, horizontal lines discourage scrolling – this doesn’t mean stop using horizontal full width elements. Have a small amount of content just visible, poking up above the fold to encourage scrolling.
  3. Avoid the use of in-page scroll bars – the browser scrollbar is an indicator of the amount of content on the page. iFrames and other elements with scroll bars in the page can break this convention and may lead to content not being seen.

Joe Leech: The myth of the page fold: evidence from user testing

Homepage essentials

April 26, 2010

The homepage is the ideal entry point for a site. It should

  1. raise attention and interest: ‘Where am I and why am I here?’
  2. provide scope and direction for its content: ‘What’s on offer?’
  3. and facilitate quick and easy actions to engage the user immediately: ‘What can I do?’

Direct links from homepage

June 5, 2008

“One of the most successful design strategies we encountered in our testing is the placement of direct links on the homepage to a very small number of high-priority operations. No matter how well you structure your information architecture or how transparently you represent it in your navigation system, users may get lost or impatient if they must navigate through multiple levels. Direct links shortcut and simplify this”

From: Nielsen, J. and Loranger, H. (2006), Prioritizing Web Usability, Berkeley, CA.: New Riders, p.210

Homepage goals

June 5, 2008
    Four goals to communicate on Home page (translates to ‘where am I’, ‘why am I here’, ‘Is
    the site uptodate?’ and ‘where can I go from here’?)

  1. What site have they arrived
  2. What benefits the organization offers
  3. What are latest products/developments
  4. various choices and how to get to the most relevant section

From: Nielsen, J. and Loranger, H. (2006), Prioritizing Web Usability, Berkeley, CA.: New Riders, p.30

Homepage essentials

June 5, 2008

A Homepage has to accomodate

  1. site identity and mission
  2. site hierarchy
  3. search
  4. Teases: Content and Feature promos
  5. Timely content (updated frequently)
  6. Deals
  7. Shortcuts
  8. Registration

More abstract objectives:

  1. Show me what I’m looking for
  2. and what I’m not looking for
  3. Show me where to start
  4. Establish credibility and trust

From: Krug, S. (2006), Don’t Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, Berkeley, CA: New Riders

From: Krug, S. (2006), Don’t Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, Berkeley, CA: New Riders