Posts Tagged ‘lifecycle’

Design, prototyping and construction

June 6, 2008
  1. Prototyping may be low fidelity (such as paper-based) or high fidelity (such as software-based)
  2. High-fidelity prototypes may be vertical or horizontal.
  3. Low-fidelity prototypes are quick and easy to produce and modify and are used in the early stages. There are two aspects to the design activity: conceptual design and physical design.
  4. Conceptual design develops a model of what the product will do and how it will behave, while physical design specifies the details of the design such as screen layout and menu structure.
  5. We have explored three perspectives to help you develop conceptual models: an interaction paradigm point of view, an interaction mode point of view, and a metaphor point of view.
  6. Scenarios and prototypes can be used effectively in conceptual design to explore ideas.
  7. We have discussed four areas of physical design: menu design, icon design, screen design and information display.
  8. There is a wide variety of support tools available to interaction designers.

From: Preece, J., Rogers, Y., Sharp, H. (2002), Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction, New York: Wiley, p.277-8

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Rapid Applications Development (RAD)

June 6, 2008

Rapid Applications Development (RAD) – takes user-centred view and
minimizes risk caused by requirements changing during the course of
the project

    Two key features:

  1. Five phases: project set up – JAD workshops – iterative design
    and build – engineer and final test prototype, implementation
    review
  2. Industry standard based on RAD is called DSDM (Dynamic Systems
    Development Method), standardized and more complex, basically
    consists of 5 phases: feasibility study, business study,
    functional model iteration, design and build iteration,
    implementation

From: Preece, J., Rogers, Y., Sharp, H. (2002), Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction, New York: Wiley

The Usability engineering lifecycle

June 6, 2008

“The lifecycle itself has essentially three tasks: requirements analysis, design/ testing/development, and installation, with the middle stage being the largest and involving many subtasks (see Figure 6.14). Note the production of a set of usability goals in the first task. Mayhew suggests that these goals be captured in a style guide that is then used throughout the project to help ensure that the usability goals are adhered to.
This lifecycle follows a similar thread to our interaction design model but includes considerably more detail. It includes stages of identifying requirements, designing, evaluating, and building prototypes. It also explicitly includes the style guide as a mechanism for capturing and disseminating the usability goals of the proJect. Recognizing that some projects will not require the level of structure presented in the fulllifecycle, Mayhew suggests that some substeps can be skipped if they are unnecessarily complex for the system being developed.”

From: Preece, J., Rogers, Y., Sharp, H. (2002), Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction, New York: Wiley, p.195