Micro Moments

Early in 2015, Google released a set of articles on what they call “micro-moments”. (…)

I-want-to-know moments

You’re at home with a nice free evening. What shall you do now? Ah! You feel like watching something. So, you want to get to the position where you can choose which movie to watch. You want to know the answer more than anything! So, you’ve just gone online to see. Here, you’re thinking with “the Google initiative”—that is, you’re searching or browsing to find out what’s hot, perhaps seeing what’s not-so-hot as you go down the reviews. You want to know which movie would be the best fit tonight.

I-want-to-go moments

You’ve decided on seeing the latest action blockbuster movie, but where? This is when you want to see what’s “Near me”.

I-want-to-do moments

You may want to learn about a process, service, or product. If you’ve ever gone on YouTube to see what others say about products, or just wanted to see how to do a job (e.g., DIY); that is where to learn. If your motorcycle won’t start and you “sort of” know what’s wrong, YouTube can show what you need. We’ll worry about which company’s motorcycle part in the next micro-moment!

I-want-to-buy moments

Your “final micro-moment” might have you start by watching any of over 1 million YouTube videos as you zero-in on which motorcycle part is the most reliable/best value before making the buy. If we’ve gone to the movie theater, maybe a friend shows us the trailer of another movie. Finding it better, you’re “sold” on seeing that instead. Congratulations, you’ve completed the process.

 

From: Muriel Garreta Domingo: Micro-moments: Are you designing for them?

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Mobile content is twice as difficult than desktop content

The smaller screen size is the main reason that mobile content is twice as difficult than desktop content: because the mobile screen is so much smaller, users must rely on their working memory to keep around information that exists on the page but is not visible in front of their eyes.

RALUCA BUDIU: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/scaling-user-interfaces/

Mobile User Experience

  • URGENT NOW
    Users are seeking urgent information on their mobile device that is ofte related to location or activity, mosthly through search engines and recommendation sites like Yelp or oursquare
  • REPETITIVE NOW
    Users are seekimg recurring realtime information, such as stock quotes, sport scores and auction listings.
  • BORED NOW
    Users are seeking distraction, entertainment or connection through a mobile device on services like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, or in their email.

From Mobify

Designing with context

Great article by Cennydd Bowles describing the seven flavours of context:

Device context

  • What devices will this product be used on?
  • How about in a year’s time? Three? Five?
  • What can those devices do? What can’t they do?
  • What sort of interactions do these devices suit?
  • Are there unique device capabilities we can use to our advantage?
  • How does our site work on devices that don’t have those capabilities?
  • Are there device capabilities that might make life more difficult? How can we mitigate their impacts?

Environmental context

  • Will the site be used indoors or outdoors?
  • Should weather conditions affect my design?
  • What environmental information sources are relevant to the interaction?
  • Will a user understand why, and how, my system is adapting to the environment?
  • How can I make my product feel natural within its environment?

Activity context

  • Do users have simple tasks to fulfil, or a more complex network of activities?
  • Are these activities or tasks digital, or do they support real-world activities?
  • Does the current activity have a physical component? How can we support that?
  • Are the interactions likely to be lean-forward, lean-back, or both?

Individual context

  • Can we use any stated preferences to tailor the system to an individual user?
  • Is it appropriate to let users explicitly state preferences for this interaction?
  • What sort of emotional connection will users have with our site, and the devices they access it from?
  • What mental attitudes do users bring to the interaction?

Location context

  • Do users have location-specific needs?
  • Will access to the user’s location improve the service my app can offer?
  • How can I best communicate why a user should grant location access?
  • Can I present location information in a more human-friendly format than long/lat?
  • How can I be sure my location assumptions are accurate?

Social context

  • Will the app be used in solo, private contexts, or in public?
  • Are there ways to reduce any risk of embarrassment or public discomfort for the user?
  • Who else is involved in this activity other than the end user?
  • Is there benefit in asking the user to authorise my app with their social networks?
  • Does my app protect the user’s sensitive information with sufficient care?

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Context design principles

  • Context is multi-faceted.
  • Don’t penalise people for their contexts.
  • Assume gently.
  • Allow adaptability.
  • Revisit your decisions.

Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web design is a combination of fluid grids and images with media queries to change layout based on the size of a device viewport. It uses feature detection (mostly on the client) to determine available device capabilities and adapt accordingly. With responsive Web design one code-base, deployment, and URL provides you with access to many devices including future ones you haven’t encountered yet. But optimizing images, video, third party widgets and more using client-only solutions can be challenging.

Luke Wroblewski