Posts Tagged ‘research’

Nonlinear human behaviour

October 3, 2017

“In science, when human behavior enters the equation, things go nonlinear. That’s why Physics is easy and Sociology is hard.”

Neil deGrasse Tyson on Twitter

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Thick data (deep insight) versus big data

October 3, 2017

“Not everything valuable is measurable.”

“Quantification bias: The unconscious belief of valuing the measurable over the immeasurable”

Tricia Wang

Jobs to be done

August 7, 2017

The Jobs-to-Be-Done framework is a representations of user needs born out of qualitative user research, such as field studies, interviews, and discount usability testing. It involves identifying for which goals customers “hire” your product (and, ideally, also finding out if there are competitor products that these users are ready to “fire”). Armed with this understanding, a product team can think about the nature of the users’ core problems and needs from a fresh perspective, and devise product features that solve that main need as best as possible.

For example, if a traditional task analysis unearthed that delivery drivers frequently needed to print out directions that showed how to navigate between each stop on their daily route, it’s likely that the design team would focus on making it as easy as possible for the drivers to format and print the directions; however, a JTBD-focused approach would focus on the delivery driver’s “job” (that is, getting navigation guidance while driving), and would look for solutions to that problem (such as a GPS system providing voice guidance).

Oftentimes, we hear JTBD advocates referring to the famous Theodore Levitt quote, “People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill, they want a quarter-inch hole.” Rather than focusing on a list of features for a product, the JTBD framework forces designers to think about outcomes: would users be able to (happily and easily) complete the job they “hired” the product for? Does this solution provide a better outcome than existing ones?

From: Personas vs. Jobs-to-Be-Done by Page Laubheimer

 

 

 

Persona attributes

August 7, 2017

Most well-crafted personas include a multitude of information such as:Demographic details, such as age, marital status, or income:

Personas vs JTBD by Page Laubheimer

August 7, 2017

Most well-crafted personas include a multitude of information such as:

  • Demographic details, such as age, marital status, or income
  • Personal details, such as a short biography, photograph, and name
  • Attitudinal and/or cognitive details, such as information about the persona’s mental model, pain points, and feelings about the tasks that need to be accomplished
  • Goals and motivations for using the product
  • Behavioral details about how the persona tends to act when using the product

Personas vs JTBD by Page Laubheimer

Replacing The User Story With The Job Story

August 1, 2017

Summed up, the problem with user stories is that it’s too many assumptions and doesn’t acknowledge causality. When a task is put in the format of a user story ( As a [type of user], I want [some action], so that [outcome] ) there’s no room to ask ‘why’ — you’re essentially locked into a particular sequence with no context.

[Suggested job sytory]

We frame every design problem in a Job, focusing on the triggering event or situation, the motivation and goal, and the intended outcome:
When _____ , I want to _____ , so I can _____ .
For example: When an important new customer signs up, I want to be notified, so I can start a conversation with them.

Alan Klement: Replacing the User Story with the Job Story

Snice OR OSEMN – taxonomy of data

August 1, 2017

What a scientist does in roughly chronological order: Obtain, Scrub, Explore, Model, and iNterpret

  1. Obtain: pointing and clicking does not scale.
  2. Scrub: the world is a messy place
  3. Explore: You can see a lot by looking
  4. Models: always bad, sometimes ugly
  5. iNterpret: “The purpose of computing is insight, not numbers.”

Hilary Mason: A taxonomy of data

 

User research methods overview

October 20, 2016

user-research-methods.png

From: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/which-ux-research-methods/

There are important things we can’t easily or accurately measure.

July 6, 2016

If we could read user’s minds, then we could in theory design the perfect experience for them. Unfortunately, we’re not all Jean Greys, so we make due with what we can measure to try and take educated guesses as to what people care about. In this day and age, what we can measure has its limits, and it’s important to always remember that. Simply looking at what people are doing in your product can’t tell you:

  • the degree to which people love, hate, or are indifferent to your product or any of its specific features
  • whether a change increases or decreases people’s trust in your product over time
  • how simple and easy to use your product is perceived to be
  • how people see your product versus other similar products in the market
  • what things people most want changed, added, or fixed
  • how people will want to use your product as time passes

Julie Zhuo: Metrics Versus Experience

Jobs-to-be-done (JTBD) Technique

June 9, 2016

A JTBD is not a product, service, or a specific solution; it’s the higher purpose for which customers buy products, services, and solutions. (…) It helps the innovator understand that customers don’t buy products and services; they hire various solutions at various times to get a wide array of jobs done.

There are two different types of JTBDs:

  1. Main jobs to be done, which describe the task that customers want to achieve.
  2. Related jobs to be done, which customers want to accomplish in conjunction with the main jobs to be done.

Then, within each of these two types of JTBDs, there are:

  1. Functional job aspects—the practical and objective customer requirements.
  2. Emotional job aspects—the subjective customer requirements related to feelings and perception.

Finally, emotional job aspects are further broken down into:

  1. Personal dimension—how the customer feels about the solution
  2. Social dimension—how the customer believes he or she is perceived by others while using the solution.

(…) The better a solution can fulfill all of these job levels and layers, the better chance it has in the marketplace. Also, the better the solution either achieves or nicely dovetails with related JTBDs, the better chance of success it has. In short, the JTBD concept is a guide for thinking beyond to make your current solutions, and your competitors’ solutions, obsolete.

From The Innovator’s Toolkit

 

The Progress Making Forces Diagram

This diagram can be used (e.g. in interviews) to explore physical, functional, social, and emotional aspects of the forces that pull people towards either tried and tested and innovative solutions.

Screen-Shot-2012-10-29-at-7.16.58-PM

 

From jobstobedone.org

 

The Customer-Jobs-To-Be-Done Canvas by Helge Tennø

Screen Shot 2016-06-09 at 17.14.26