Posts Tagged ‘webHistory’

Emerging Web trends

February 15, 2010

“There’s no way of picking apart all of that stuff. There’s no curational layer. It terrifies me.” [Jack Schulze, Berg, about being stressed by Google reader]

“The fundamental problem, Öhrvall [Bonniers, Stockholm] argues, is the absence of closure in most digital narratives. On the Web, you ‘always link somewhere else, the story never ends. No sense of completion. For us, it was clear that there was something missing. We realised there must be other ways to tell a story in digital media, apart from millions of look-alike sites on the Web.

“Most of these publishers have a very strong drive to maintain the integrity of the printed product. (…) More than anything else, they have fought against the atomisation of content on the Web.”

From: Tablets of the new covenant by Peter Kirwan, Wired UK, March 10, p. 42 – 46

Web: Structuralists v Designers

June 11, 2008

“This was the great, almost religious difference between the Structuralists and the designers. The Structuralists were separatists, believing that form and content could and should be separated. For them, a Web site is a pipe through which content flows to the user. They opposed elaborate visual design, which they thought impeded the flow of information. The Designers, on the other hand, were unitarians, who believed that form and content could not be separated: that a Web page communicates its message through the careful interplay of words and images. For the Designers, a Web page is an experience, and they wanted complete control over it, just as they had enjoyed (more or less) complete control in print. So the Designers kept pressing for more html tags that would give them that control.”

From: Bolter, Jay David and Gromala, Diane (2003), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art, and the Myth of Transparency, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, p.4

From: Bolter, Jay David and Gromala, Diane (2003), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art, and the Myth of Transparency, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Today’s Web: collaboration between design, interaction, and IA

June 6, 2008

We are now in a “stage of Web-evolution where it is clear that a good Web-experience is the result of mutual collaboration between presentation, interaction, and organization considerations.”

From: Wroblewski, Luke (2002), Site-Seeing: A Visual Approach to Web-Usability, New York: Hungry Minds, p.12

Today’s Web: collaboration between design, interaction, and IA

June 6, 2008

We are now in a “stage of Web-evolution where it is clear that a good Web-experience is the result of mutual collaboration between presentation, interaction, and organization considerations.”

From: Wroblewski, Luke (2002), Site-Seeing: A Visual Approach to Web-Usability, New York: Hungry Minds, p.12

Wroblewski’s History of the Web

June 6, 2008
  1. The simple sharing era
  2. The image and table era
  3. The design intro era
  4. The techno-hype era (“the teenage years” p.09)
  5. The usability era: “On the advice of these frustrated users, Web sites began
    focussing on clarity, efficiency, and customer satisfaction.
    Within a usable Web site, customers can accomplisch
    theirgoals easily and leave happily.” p.10-11
  6. The speaking Web

From: Wroblewski, Luke (2002), Site-Seeing: A Visual Approach to Web-Usability, New York: Hungry Minds

Wroblewski’s History of the Web

June 6, 2008
  1. The simple sharing era
  2. The image and table era
  3. The design intro era
  4. The techno-hype era (“the teenage years” p.09)
  5. The usability era: “On the advice of these frustrated users, Web sites began
    focussing on clarity, efficiency, and customer satisfaction.
    Within a usable Web site, customers can accomplisch
    theirgoals easily and leave happily.” p.10-11
  6. The speaking Web

From: Wroblewski, Luke (2002), Site-Seeing: A Visual Approach to Web-Usability, New York: Hungry Minds