Archive for the 'emergency lane' Category

Why White Space Is Crucial To UX Design

February 14, 2017

White space can be broken down into four elements:

  • visual white space (space surrounding graphics, icons, and images);
  • layout white space (margins, paddings, and gutters);
  • text white space (spacing between lines and spacing between letters); and
  • content white space (space separating columns of text).

Jerry Cao and Kamil Zieba and Matt Ellis

Design critique

December 19, 2016

Criticism passes judgement — Critique poses questions
Criticism finds fault — Critique uncovers opportunity
Criticism is personal — Critique is objective
Criticism is vague — Critique is concrete
Criticism tears down — Critique builds up
Criticism is ego-centric — Critique is altruistic
Criticism is adversarial — Critique is cooperative
Criticism belittles the designer — Critique improves the design

From: Judy Reeves

See also Jared Spool’s article

Design the beginning

October 31, 2016

The “beginning” is how you introduce something new to a person, and how you will get them to understand its value such that they incorporate it into their lives. When you set about designing the beginning, you are forced to consider the following hard questions:

  1. Where and how will people first hear about your product or feature?
  2. What should people understand about your product at a glance, and is that compelling enough to convince them to go through the trouble of trying it out?
  3. What should people’s first-time experience through your product be, and how do you plan to demonstrate to them its value within the first minute?
  4. How will you build out the social graph, content inventory, marketplace, etc. if the success of your product is dependent on those things?
  5. What would compel somebody to come back and use your product a second or third time?

Julie Zhuo: Design the Beginning

User research methods overview

October 20, 2016

user-research-methods.png

From: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/which-ux-research-methods/

What Causes Behavior Change?

September 19, 2016

The Fogg Behavior Model shows that three elements must converge at the same moment for a behavior to occur: Motivation, Ability, and Trigger. When a behavior does not occur, at least one of those three elements is missing.

Behaviour change elements: motiviation, ability, trigger

Core Motivators: pleasure/pain; hope/fear; social acceptance/rejection

Simplicity factors: time; money; physical effort; brain cycles; social deviance; non-routine

Triggers: facilitator; spark; signal

BJ Fogg’s Behavioral Model

How Friendly is your site?

March 28, 2016

Check how friendly your site is:

Mobile friendly? There is a good chance that some of your users will be arriving via their phones and tablets, and almost nothing is more di cult to navigate than a site thats not mobile friendly. If a user cannot navigate your site, they can’t become customers.

Browser friendly? Not all browsers are built the same–that goes without saying, but do you know what browsers are most popular among your users? There is a chance that your site is awesome on Chrome, but a mess on Internet Explorer. Do the research. Load up the browsers and make sure a user’s arrival is always solid. Fixing any browser speci c issues could result in rise in conversions.

Privacy friendly? It is good to show users their information is secure: signals, like SSL (https://) lock images, trusted badges, and social proof can all allay fears. Make sure you have a complete privacy policy linked from the footer of every page on your site.

Language friendly? There are 50 million Spanish-language Internet users in the United States alone. That’s more than the total Internet-using population of the UK. If you’re ignoring language support, you could be leaving a lot of money on the table.

User friendly? No user will ever complain that your site is too easy to use, fast or clear. A mistake free site is a credible site.

Click friendly? How many clicks does it take for a user to get to your must have experience? Have you ever counted? Think less. Think the clearest and easiest path to revenue.

Time friendly? Information on your landing page should be prioritized by importance. You typically have ve seconds to convince a visitor to stick around. Make the most of that brief moment in time. How good is your hook, and how well do you deliver on the promise?

Video friendly? A video on your landing page has the chance to drive conversions. Consider YouTube, or other services as long as users do not have to download additional plugins. Videos can elicit an emotional response that connects with users and drives conversion.

Rating & review friendly? If your site has a rating system for product feedback, it is best not to be totalitarian. Erasing all negative feedback will only have uses questioning your credibility. If you allow reviews on your site, make sure the quality is high. Zappos found that correcting spelling errors in product reviews increased conversion. Details matter![5, 6]

Lightbox overlay

February 4, 2016

Don’t use an overlay unless you have a clear, compelling case for why this content should not be presented within a regular page. Good reasons for using an overlay could include:

  • The user is about to take an action that has serious consequences and is difficult to reverse.
  • It’s essential to collect a small amount of information before letting users proceed to the next step in a process.
  • The content in the overlay is urgent, and users are more likely to notice it in an overlay.

Kathryn Whitenton in https://www.nngroup.com/articles/overuse-of-overlays/

Three (only?) justifications for mobile apps

December 21, 2015

There’s a reason why they (Apps) are popular on mobile:

  • they are highly contextual and
  • take big advantage of the phones main functionalities, be it geolocation, camera or just voice and sound.
  • They are also aimed at repeated use in small chunks of time.

Jean-Baptiste Coger: Why you shouldn’t bother creating a mobile app.

10 service design heuristics

December 8, 2015

Our Ten Service Design Heuristics

1. Address Real Need

Solve people’s problems while providing value that feels like it’s worth the effort. Base service models on needs identified from contextual research with people.

2. Clarity of Service Offering

Provide a clear service offering in familiar terms. Actors should easily grasp if a service is right for them and what they are trying to deliver.

3. Build Lasting Relationships

The service system should support appropriate interactions, allow for flexibility of use, and foster ongoing relationships. The right level of engagement supports an evolving service experience.

4. Leverage Existing Resources

Consider the whole system and what existing parts could be used to better deliver the service. Find opportunities to augment, repurpose, or redeploy resources.

5. Actor Autonomy and Freedom

The service ecosystem should fit around the habits of those involved. Do not expect people to adapt their life or work styles to suit the service model.

6. Graceful Entry and Exit

Provide flexible, natural entry and exit points to and from the service. Consider when it is appropriate for actors to jump in, or to achieve closure.

7. Set Expectations

Let actors know succinctly what to expect. Assist understanding of where they are in the system through the design of environments and information.

8. The Right Information at the Right Time

Tell the actors of the system what they need to know with the right level of detail at the right time. Weigh the costs and benefits of providing more or less precise information.

9. Consistency Across Channels at any Scale

Continuity of brand, experience, and information should exist across the entire service system. Actors should be able to seamlessly move across channels.

10. Appropriate Pace and Rhythm of Delivery

All actors should experience and provide the service at a suitable and sustainable pace.

 

Usability Matters

MVE Minimum Viable Experience

December 8, 2015

Minimum Viable Experience: The smallest, easiest-to-make version of your idea that you can reasonably launch as an experience.

Ben Crothers