What experience design is and isn’t

Experience design is about creating platforms where people can live their experiences rather than designing a detailed experience for them.

Aga Szóstek: CX strategy is about saying ‘no’

 

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What is good design?

Design is a set of decisions, a set of choices among the infinite ways to solve a problem. The more intentional and skillful the choices, the better the design. The more value those choices create or provide access to, the better the design is for business. Take our old time internet friend Craigslist, which exhibits negligible style. The design of that system has created tremendous value for both the business and the users—and heck the casual reader too—for over 20 years.

Thinking about design in terms of the exchange of value, is the path to thinking about the whole problem.

Erika Hall: Thinking in Triplicate

 

A good user experience depends on …

A good user experience depends on:

  • Clear structure and navigation flows;
  • Compelling and clear visual design;
  • Great copy and tone of voice;
  • Thoughtful transitions and animations;
  • The app’s performance and speed;
  • The user’s mobile phone performance and speed;
  • The user’s internet connection;
  • The product making sense to that user;
  • The product adding value to what that user needs;
  • A clear understanding by the user of what the product does;
  • How accessible the product is;
  • The user’s social, cultural and demographic context;
  • Where the user is at the time they engage with the app;
  • Everything the user has seen in their entire life;
  • How the user is feeling that particular day they use the product;
  • Etc, etc, etc.

Fabricio Teixeira: https://uxdesign.cc/hey-can-you-do-the-ux-for-us-432a38eac295

Design the beginning

The “beginning” is how you introduce something new to a person, and how you will get them to understand its value such that they incorporate it into their lives. When you set about designing the beginning, you are forced to consider the following hard questions:

  1. Where and how will people first hear about your product or feature?
  2. What should people understand about your product at a glance, and is that compelling enough to convince them to go through the trouble of trying it out?
  3. What should people’s first-time experience through your product be, and how do you plan to demonstrate to them its value within the first minute?
  4. How will you build out the social graph, content inventory, marketplace, etc. if the success of your product is dependent on those things?
  5. What would compel somebody to come back and use your product a second or third time?

Julie Zhuo: Design the Beginning

There are important things we can’t easily or accurately measure.

If we could read user’s minds, then we could in theory design the perfect experience for them. Unfortunately, we’re not all Jean Greys, so we make due with what we can measure to try and take educated guesses as to what people care about. In this day and age, what we can measure has its limits, and it’s important to always remember that. Simply looking at what people are doing in your product can’t tell you:

  • the degree to which people love, hate, or are indifferent to your product or any of its specific features
  • whether a change increases or decreases people’s trust in your product over time
  • how simple and easy to use your product is perceived to be
  • how people see your product versus other similar products in the market
  • what things people most want changed, added, or fixed
  • how people will want to use your product as time passes

Julie Zhuo: Metrics Versus Experience